EU Settlement Scheme and access to NHS healthcare

If you are an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen who was living in Scotland on, or before, 31 December 2020, you should have applied to the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) before the deadline of 30 June 2021.

You can apply after the deadline if you have reasonable grounds. You can find help and support on The Scottish Government website.

Adults with children must also apply on behalf of their children.

Irish citizens and people with indefinite leave to remain do not have to apply.

EU, EEA or Swiss citizens who started to live in Scotland from 1 January 2021 are not eligible to apply through the EUSS. You must instead apply under the UK Government's immigration rules to live in Scotland.

Access to NHS Treatment

If you are an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen who was living in Scotland on 31 December 2021 you can continue to use and receive NHS services.  

NHS Scotland does not pass patient details to the Home Office for the purpose of immigration control.

Anyone in Scotland can register with a GP (family doctor) and can receive general medical treatment and prescriptions free of charge.

You should always seek NHS treatment if you need it

Arrangements after the EUSS deadline

NHS staff will not ask you to provide evidence that you have pre-settled or settled status.

NHS Boards will not pursue treatment charges, for hospital or specialist treatment, from people who are eligible for settlement but still need to make an application.

If you do not apply, you may no longer have a legal right to remain in the UK under immigration law. Immigration law is a matter for the UK Government rather than the Scottish Government. Under these circumstances, NHS Boards may have no option but to charge you for hospital or specialist treatment in the future.

Treatment which is always free of charge

The NHS in Scotland will not charge any patient for:

  • tests and treatment for coronavirus (COVID-19)
  • emergency treatment provided at an A&E, Casualty Department or Minor Injuries Clinic
  • general medical services provided by a General Practitioner (GP)
  • prescriptions issued by a GP
  • advice provided by a family planning clinic
  • tests and treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)